13 Responses to Sharing the joy of discovery

  1. What an amazing opportunity for undergrads; I feel like exposing students to that experience of being the first people in the world to know something could have big impact on their interest in pursuing science. I’ve been involved in a few courses where we have tried to incorporate a research component into an existing undergraduate course. But designing a course from the ground up around a specific research question is ambitious to say the least. My research plans always seem to underestimate the number of hurdles I will have to overcome and helping a large group of undergrads through those hurdles seems like it might be challenging. I look forward to reading the updates as this course progresses. Maybe you could share a lessons learned at the end of the course so that we can all learn from your efforts!

    • Hi Heath,
      It might be a bit overly ambitious, but I’m going for it! (I do have a few “cakes in the oven”, which should help in making it manageable.) And I will share whatever lessons I might learn from this.
      David

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