Tag Archives: Lionepha

Happiness is a Big Tree on the Wall

  In the hallway outside my lab, about 800 species of Bembidiina, together in one tree. ¬†ūüôā

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Sheep Creek in the Cascades of Oregon

Here’s a lovely creek in the Cascades of Oregon. ¬† This part of Sheep Creek is at 795m elevation. ¬†It has a rich bembidiine fauna living in the gravel patches along the shoreline. ¬†In addition to two species of Lionepha … Continue reading

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Examining name-bearers at the USNM

I’m at the Smithsonian Institution for the next three days, working in the United States Museum of Natural History (the “USNM”).¬† My main goal is to look at type specimens, especially Casey types, so that I can figure out what … Continue reading

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Shutting down Lionepha lummi

I am quite sure that this is the habitat of Lionepha lummi. ¬†The picture below shows American Camp, on San Juan Island, not far from Friday Harbor, in Washington state. ¬†And I think tomorrow would be a perfect day to … Continue reading

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Rainy-season beetles

The rains have returned to the Pacific Northwest. ¬†During the last few days a rain-drop symphony has been playing in my house in the woods, and the douglas fir and oaks are weeping in thanks for fall’s arrival after a … Continue reading

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Another surprise in Lionepha

Two days ago I had a post about an unexpected species of Lionepha in the Sierras, of which I became aware when I looked at a specimen that my graduate student John Sproul caught on the South Fork of Bishop … Continue reading

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A surprise in Lionepha

In the late spring I was in the final stages of a manuscript about the genus Lionepha. ¬†This paper will describe the new species I have mentioned earlier, describe the male of Lionepha chintimini for the first time, document DNA … Continue reading

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Names approved!

In two earlier posts, I wrote about the dangers of naming species after the name of the first peoples of an area, as well as the concerns about using a word from a native language. In the first of those … Continue reading

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Sculpture on a very small scale

If one looks up close onto the back of a carabid beetle, one will see (in most species) very fine, engraved lines which form a pattern, usually looking like honeycombs, or bricks, or long, thin parallel lines. ¬†This is called … Continue reading

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Names in native languages

In an early post, I talked about how naming a species after the native people of an area should be done with caution, and ideally with permission.¬† While a name of a tribe is potentially offensive, I had thought that … Continue reading

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